Old news from Armidale and New England

Local news from newspaper archives

Posts Tagged ‘booroolong

Native dogs

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Australian Town and Country Journal (NSW : 1870 – 1907), Wednesday 10 June 1903

Native Dogs.

In several districts around Armidale, such as Borrolong and Cooney Creek, the settlers have formed associations to protect themselves against the ravages of the native dogs, which are very destructive among the sheep (writes our Armidale correspondent). These associations offer high bonuses in many instances for the scalps of the pests, but are unable to keep them down, consequently the sheep have to be folded at night in the worst places, and woe betide the stragglers left out in the muster, for nothing but the partly-devoured carcase will be found the next morning.

A considerable amount of money has been spent in erecting dog-proof fences, but even this is not always effective, as it is very difficult, especially in the falls country, to make it snug and tight, and the cunning brutes soon find out the weak places in the fences. In the cattle country, however, the landowners do not go to any trouble or expense to get rid of the dogs, and as a consequence, they are to be seen in droves, and are a menace even to persons travelling about.

Opossum-shooters and trappers state that these wild animals got so bold as to follow the men about within 20yd or 30yd of them, and it is a common thing to find the snares cleared of the opossums by the dogs. They state that parts of the country are becoming overrun by the pests, owing to no inducement being offered to destroy them, nothing whatever being offered for the scalps.

If a uniform price was offered by all the stock boards, it would pay men to go out and kill them, but under existing circumstances there is nothing to do but to let them increase and multiply. It is a common thing to see young cattle torn about by the posts, and the stockowners appear to be quite unconcerned about the matter. It is asserted that the apathy of the big landowners is due to a desire on their part to got rid of the small land owners in those localities, as, by allowing the dogs to increase, they will become so menacing that the small men will be driven out of their holdings.

It is contended that an Act should be passed compelling landowners to take steps to clear their properties of native dogs, just the same as they are compelled to deal with rabbits; but, better still, the stock boards should be made to fix a price per scalp, which would encourage the destruction of the pests, and thereby find employment for a goodly number of men. This is a question our legislators might give a little attention to.

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Written by macalba

April 23, 2013 at 8:57 am

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Henry Copeland in Armidale

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Friday 9 October 1903, The Sydney Morning Herald

MR. COPELAND AT ARMIDALE.

ARMIDALE, Thursday.

The Hon. Henry Copeland was entertained at a banquet at Tattersall’s Hotel. There was a good attendance, including visitors from Hillgrove and Booroolong. The Mayor presided, and proposed the health of Mr. Copeland, and was supported by Messrs. Wilson, Drew, Scholes, and others. The toast was enthusiastically received. Mr. Copeland, in acknowledging the toast, said he thought it was more than likely that Mr. Chamberlain would come out on top.

Mr. Copeland left last night by mail train.

Written by macalba

May 8, 2011 at 8:02 pm

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Arrest of a bushranger

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Friday 12 March 1886, The Mercury (Hobart)

The police and black trackers arrested Frost, alias Riley, early on Sunday morning, in his camp in a gorge on the Booroolong Mountains. A stolen horse and samples of gold and rubies were found in his possession. Riley has been identified as the man who robbed the mail at Kingston two years ago, and is believed to be the man who recently stuck up the Tamworth and Warialda mail.

Written by macalba

October 2, 2010 at 8:01 pm

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Gas lighting, and fish stocks

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Tuesday 6 October 1885, The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser

(Armidale Express, Oct. 2.)

It is slated that Armidale is likely to be lighted with gas about the end of next week. The water that had accumulated in the tank was being pumped out yesterday in order to allow of some work being done at the bottom of the holder. When this is completed the tank will be filled and the process of gas making can be commenced.

Some of the young trout have already been liberated in the Wollomombi river, and were carried most successfully, not one being lost. The Gara River will be stocked in several places, the Wollomumbi in two places, and a good number of young fish will be turned into the Apsley. There are also small lots to go into the Ollera, Boorolong, and Roumalla creeks, and a consignment has already been taken out for Aberfoyle.

Written by macalba

September 21, 2010 at 8:06 pm

Shearers’ strike at Booroolong

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Friday 27 November 1908, The Sydney Morning Herald

ARMIDALE, Thursday.

The shearers at Booroolong station struck work a few days ago, alleging that the sheep were wet after the recent rains. However, the manager decided otherwise, and all were discharged. Fresh hands were immediately engaged.

Written by macalba

April 22, 2010 at 2:09 pm

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Mining at Booroolong

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Monday 14 September 1903, The Sydney Morning Herald

ARMIDALE. Saturday.

News from Boorolong is to the effect that the Back Creek millers are now working hard, and have good prospects. Upson and party and also Mouley and party are both on good tin.

Written by macalba

April 22, 2010 at 6:05 am

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