Old news from Armidale and New England

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Posts Tagged ‘cooney creek

Dingoes in New England

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The Sydney Wool and Stock Journal (NSW : 1899 – 1917), Friday 11 August 1899

Dingoes in New England.

To the editor of the Sydney Wool and Stock Journal.

Sir, – Allow me to correct an error in your issue of the 4th last relating to the meeting of sheep owners at Cooney Creek. You state that. “It was decided that each farmer should contribute an equal sum to complete the fence round the falls.” It should have read : “That each farmer be asked to contribute £2 to form a fund to pay £4 per dog scalp, owner to keep the scalp.”

Yours, etc.,

H. E. BIGG.

Armidale, Aug. 7.

——————–

The Sydney Wool and Stock Journal (NSW : 1899 – 1917), Friday 29 September 1899

Dingo Destruction Association.

(From a correspondent.)

ARMIDALE, Sept. 25.

At a meeting of stockowners of the Gara River district, held at Cooney Creek Hotel, near Armidale, on the 22nd inst., it was decided to form the above association for the purpose of dealing with the dingo pest, which is becoming very serious in the district. Several stockowners have already forwarded their subscriptions of £2 each, and it is earnestly hoped that all others interested will do so without delay.

The association has much pleasure in acknowledging, with thanks, the receipt of a donation of £10 from Winchcombe, Carson, and Co., Ltd., through their Armidale agents, Messrs. Dight and Blaxland.

It was agreed that a bonus of £4 will be paid for any dingo destroyed upon the land of members irrespective of the bonus already paid by the stock board. No one is allowed to shoot without permission of the landholders.

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Written by macalba

May 14, 2013 at 8:42 am

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Outrage by the Macleay Blacks

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The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893), Saturday 18 June 1864

Telegraphic Intelligence.

(From the Herald and Empire.)

Outrage by the Macleay Blacks.

On Sunday last about 50 Macleay blacks appeared on Gara, the head station of which is about 12 miles from Armidale. According to the information we have received, they went to a hut at an out station at Cooney’s Creek, and bailed up Mrs. Greves, one black standing over her with a tomahawk, while the others robbed the hut of flour and other articles. They also met a boy named Duberry, and, after robbing him of some tobacco, they halved his sheep and look away 400 or 500 to the edge of the Falls.

Mr. Edward Allingham, Jun., the superintendent, on receiving information of these outrages, went to Cooney’s Creek, accompanied by a stockman, and another man. When they came near a black ran from the hut, but on overtaking and threatening him he told them where the other blacks were. Mr. Allingham left him in charge of one of his men, and, in company with his stockman, galloped into the camp, scattering the blacks and shooting one of the dogs. The sheep being there, the blacks that remained were asked why they had taken them, when they said they did not want them ; they only wanted potatoes (of which there were some at the out station). They denied that they had guns, but eventually they delivered up four pieces. A fifth gun they had same trouble in getting a black to surrender.

In the camp were found two canisters of powder, one box of caps, some balls, and several blankets which appeared to have been distributed at Armidale. It is believed that the blacks had two other guns which were not got. None of the sheep had been killed, as the blacks said they were no good – not fat enough – but had Mr. Allingham been an hour later they would have been taken down the Falls, it is believed, and lost.

Armidale Express, June 11.

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May 13, 2013 at 8:43 am

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Dingoes in New England

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Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal (NSW : 1851 – 1904), Tuesday 15 August 1899

Dingoes in New England.

The dingo pest, as experienced in the New England district, and especially in the neighbourhood of Hillgrave Falls, assumed such dimensions that landowners have had to combine for their own protection, and to this end a meeting was hold at Cooney Creek. A very large scope contiguous to Hillgrave Falls, mostly occupied by small holders, for years has been infested by dingoes. These dogs hide in the falls during the day, and visit the flocks by night.

Of late deaths have been very heavy, as many as 20 being killed out of one flock in one night. Some farmers have erected fences proof against dogs, but as others could not bear the expense, the dingoes were still enabled to carry on operations on a few holdings. On Castle Doyle the farmers fold the sheep every night, but this process entails an enormous amount of labor. It was decided that each farmer should contribute an equal sum of money towards the cost of completing the construction of a fence round the falls.

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May 4, 2013 at 8:17 am

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Fatal riding accident

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Goulburn Evening Penny Post (NSW : 1881 – 1940), Thursday 23 November 1899

Fatal Riding Accident.

Armidale, Wednesday. — William Mulligan, aged 22, a son of Mr. Francis Mulligan, grazier, died at his father’s residence, Cooney Creek, last evening. One day last week deceased was out mustering sheep with his brother, when his horse shied and ran against a tree. Young Mulligan, as a result of the collision, was thrown to the ground. He recovered himself quickly, caught and remounted his horse, and resumed mustering operations. Subsequently Mulligan complained of feeling unwell, and, after gradually becoming worse, died from internal inflammation.

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April 28, 2013 at 11:28 am

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Wool reports

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Forbes Times (NSW: 1912 – 1920), Friday 5 March 1915

Wool Reports

Winchcombe, Carson Ltd. have received the following wire from there Brisbane office :— “Brisbane wool market opened strong. Prices fully equal to late Sydney rates. Bradford and France buying more heavily. America still operating keenly. Good demand Spanish and Italian account. Bulky skirtings selling owners’ favor. Improved inquiry for faulty lines.”

John Bridge and Co. report :— Woolgrowers, in these days of depression, will read with keen interest the following:— At the wool sales on February 24th, John Bridge and Co. obtained for 141 bales of fleece wool, part of R. J. Mulligan’s “Bailey Park” clip from Cooney Creek Armidale, an average price of over 15¼d per lb, which worked out in cash at an average of practically £19 5s per bale. For the whole clip, consisting of 265 bales, including all skirtings and locks, an average of £17 per bale was obtained. The top price for the fleece wool was 16½d per lb. which constitutes a record for this season, and even, exceeds last season’s record of 16d. The pieces realised 13½d, a price which establishes another record for the present season, and beats any price obtained for pieces during the past three seasons. The bellies were sold at 10d, crutchings at 5¾d, and locks at 5¾d. These handsome prices go to show that capable management and proper handling of a clip tell their own tale.

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April 24, 2013 at 8:26 am

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Native dogs

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Australian Town and Country Journal (NSW : 1870 – 1907), Wednesday 10 June 1903

Native Dogs.

In several districts around Armidale, such as Borrolong and Cooney Creek, the settlers have formed associations to protect themselves against the ravages of the native dogs, which are very destructive among the sheep (writes our Armidale correspondent). These associations offer high bonuses in many instances for the scalps of the pests, but are unable to keep them down, consequently the sheep have to be folded at night in the worst places, and woe betide the stragglers left out in the muster, for nothing but the partly-devoured carcase will be found the next morning.

A considerable amount of money has been spent in erecting dog-proof fences, but even this is not always effective, as it is very difficult, especially in the falls country, to make it snug and tight, and the cunning brutes soon find out the weak places in the fences. In the cattle country, however, the landowners do not go to any trouble or expense to get rid of the dogs, and as a consequence, they are to be seen in droves, and are a menace even to persons travelling about.

Opossum-shooters and trappers state that these wild animals got so bold as to follow the men about within 20yd or 30yd of them, and it is a common thing to find the snares cleared of the opossums by the dogs. They state that parts of the country are becoming overrun by the pests, owing to no inducement being offered to destroy them, nothing whatever being offered for the scalps.

If a uniform price was offered by all the stock boards, it would pay men to go out and kill them, but under existing circumstances there is nothing to do but to let them increase and multiply. It is a common thing to see young cattle torn about by the posts, and the stockowners appear to be quite unconcerned about the matter. It is asserted that the apathy of the big landowners is due to a desire on their part to got rid of the small land owners in those localities, as, by allowing the dogs to increase, they will become so menacing that the small men will be driven out of their holdings.

It is contended that an Act should be passed compelling landowners to take steps to clear their properties of native dogs, just the same as they are compelled to deal with rabbits; but, better still, the stock boards should be made to fix a price per scalp, which would encourage the destruction of the pests, and thereby find employment for a goodly number of men. This is a question our legislators might give a little attention to.

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April 23, 2013 at 8:57 am

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Cooney Creek Tragedy

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The Sydney Morning Herald, Thursday 20 November 1919

COONEY CREEK TRAGEDY

ARMIDALE, Wednesday.

The inquest in connection with the Cooney Creek tragedy was resumed at Hillgrove this morning.

Dr. Harris, of Armidale, said a lot of force had been used to kill the deceased. He did not think the girl (deceased’s daughter) could have done it.

After a short adjournment the coroner returned an open verdict. The accused girl, Ida Willmott, was then formally brought before the Police Court and discharged.

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November 11, 2011 at 8:02 am

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