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“Australia Unlimited”

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Cairns Post (Qld.), Wednesday 7 March 1945

In his 35-page book on the Clarence River hydro-electric gorge scheme, Sir Earle Page. M.H.R., a member of the Australian Country Party, has introduced into the murky atmosphere of politics that gleam of combiner idealism and common sense which is as refreshing as it is scarce at the present moment. In a masterly review of the publication. Hon. D. H. Drummond, M.L.A., Deputy Leader of the New South Wales Country Party, comments that the book contains more challenge to thought, to constructive criticism, to courage and to imagination than any other one thing that has been produced during the whole period of the war. It makes the other plans for post-war reconstruction look like midgets of ineffectual vision. Whether the critic will agree with the Doctor, or whether he win disagree, he will find himself forced up against the question which the Japanese menace still points, viz., that if Australia and Australians do not tackle these things in a big way, they may never have the final opportunity of completing them even in a small way.

Sir Earl draws pointed attention to the lack of an electrical connecting link between Sydney, the greatest Australian manufacturing city, Newcastle, its great coal and power producing centre, and Brisbane, the centre of Queensland’s industrial activity. Briefly his suggestions for immediate action are the linking up of Newcastle and Brisbane with a 66,000-volt power line, via Werris Creek, Armidale, Glen Innes and the Clarence Gorge, with another line of 165,000 volts as far as Werris Creek, then of 68,000 volts as far as the Clarence Gorge, and from thence to Brisbane of 165,000 volts.

The question of an immediate market for the total output of the gorge hydro-electric development would be completely changed if it were an integral part of the Newcastle-Brisbane high voltage transmission system. Brisbane would be immediately able to purchase a substantial portion of the whole output, and the balance would be absorbed locally or utilised in the general transmission system.

A study of the data, says Sir Earle, will show the high priority of the undertaking. A consideration of its immediate and remote benefits will demonstrate that, though this dam, when constructed, will be the largest in Australia, it will immediately prove fully reproductive from its inception. This is due to its geographical position, combined with the economic progress that the development of both primary and secondary industries in southern Queensland and northern New South Wales has already attained.

He visualises in the main scheme the full development of the watershed of the Clarence, which includes, not only the Clarence Gorge, Jackadgery, Nymboida and other reservoirs, but also the Styx hydro-electric scheme on the Macleay, and a number of other subsidiary schemes which all will contribute their share to the ultimate development of the area. It is estimated that if the major scheme is ultimately developed to the full, in the case of the gorge proposal, a dam 320 ft. high would impound 3,400,000 ac. feet. This does not probably convey very much to anyone until it is realised that the storage would be equal in capacity to three dams of the size of the Hume on the Murray River, and would, very closely approximate to the famous Assuan dam on the Nile River of 4,000,000 acre feet.

(Contributed by the Australian Country Party, Queensland.)

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Written by macalba

September 28, 2011 at 8:08 am

New England highlights

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Tuesday 30 October 1894, The Sydney Morning Herald

BELLINGEN, MONDAY

The land board dealt with a number of cases on
Saturday. The chairman congratulated Mr.
Matthews upon his appointment to the board.

Heavy thunderstorms were experienced last
week. The weather is fine, with hot days and
cool nights. The crops are making great head-
way.

General satisfaction is expressed at the accept-
ance of the tender for the mail from Bellingen to
Tyringham, which will afford the Dorrigo settlers
means of postal communication.

COONABARABRAN, MONDAY

The present is probably one of the most prolific
seasons we have been blessed with in this district
for many years. Last week 2in. of rain fell.

Vegetation is in abundance, while stock of all
descriptions are looking sleek and fat. The crops,
oaten and wheaten, give every prospect of a boun-
tiful harvest. Many of our farmers are at present
engaged in getting their corn and potato
crops in.

The hospital ball last week was a great success
Over 120 people sat down to supper, and £35 clear
was made by the venture.

The Rev. W. Milne Curran, from the Technical
College, delivered three lectures here which were
numerously attended each night. The lecturer
was listened to with intense interest and profound
attention. There were many ladies present on
each occasion, who evinced the greatest interest.

During the past fortnight about 3000 acres of
land have been taken up at the local land
office.

GRAFTON, MONDAY

The Rev. A. Dallas has been appointed to the
South Grafton Parish, Church of England.

Mr. J. P. Eagles, manager of the Grafton
branch of the E. S. and A. Bank, has been ap-
pointed to the head office, Sydney, and will be
succeeded by Mr. Toon, from Victoria.

Mr. R. R. Hickson, Chief Commissioner for
Roads, and Mr. W. L. Vernon Government Ar-
chitect, arrived here on Saturday on an official
tour through the north-west districts.

Disease has again appeared in the potato crop.

KEMPSEY, MONDAY.  

Numbers of farmers are experimenting with the
sugar-beet seed supplied by the Department of
Agriculture. If the district is proved suitable a
large area is expected to be planted next year.

It is proposed to close the A. J. S. Bank branch
at Frederickton at the end of the present month.

A jawbone and several other remains of a
human being have been picked up on the beach
near Crescent Head. They are supposed to be the
remains of a person shipwrecked some years ago.
Old bolts and rings belonging to a ship have also
been found.

The A. J. S. Bank has offered to release £200 on
fixed deposit belonging to the Macleay District
Hospital. This will help the financial difficulty
of the hospital for the present.

LISMORE, MONDAY

The contractors who have completed works for
the municipal council on the main roads within the
municipality are complaining of delay in their
payment, said to be caused by the Government
withholding money from the municipality. The
delay has now exceeded several weeks. The muni-
cipal authorities state that the fault does not rest
with them.

NEWCASTLE, MONDAY

By a concert given last evening in the Victoria
Theatre, in aid of the funds of the Newcastle
Hospital and the Newcastle Benevolent Society,
£61 was realised.

As a result of the fracas on Saturday and
yesterday in Newcastle and Stockton between
non-unionists and unionists, Denis Maloney was
fined 5s, but a large number of summonses have  
been issued from each side.

Written by macalba

March 9, 2010 at 6:40 am